https://journali-srr.com/index.php/I-SRR/issue/feed International STD Research & Reviews 2023-05-22T06:45:42+00:00 International STD Research & Reviews contact@journali-srr.com Open Journal Systems <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>International STD Research &amp; Reviews (ISSN:&nbsp;2347-5196)</strong>&nbsp;aims to publish high-quality papers (<a href="/index.php/I-SRR/general-guideline-for-authors">Click here for Types of paper</a>) in all areas of ‘Sexually Transmitted Disease related research’. By not excluding papers based on novelty, this journal facilitates the research and wishes to publish papers as long as they are technically correct and scientifically motivated. The journal also encourages the submission of useful reports of negative results. This is a quality controlled, OPEN peer-reviewed, open-access INTERNATIONAL journal.</p> https://journali-srr.com/index.php/I-SRR/article/view/154 Protecting Your Health: A Comprehensive Review of Sexually Transmitted Illnesses 2023-04-12T09:50:46+00:00 Godwin Mmaduabuchi Ikokwu godwin.ikokwu@pharm.uniben.edu Ikalo David Oseghale Osedebamen Hilary Ralph-Okhiria Esosa Frances Ighile <p>Sexually transmitted Infections are a class of diseases that are spread through sex. They can infect anyone who is sexually active regardless of age, gender, or sexual orientation. Common STIs include gonorrhea, syphilis, herpes, HIV/AIDS, and human papillomavirus (HPV).Many STIs have no visible symptoms, which means that individuals can unknowingly transmit the infection to their sexual partners. STIs can have serious health consequences if left untreated, including infertility, chronic pain, and a higher chance of contracting HIV.Prevention measures include using a condom while having sex, regular testing, and vaccination for HPV. Early diagnosis and treatment can effectively manage STIs and reduce the risk of complications. It is essential to educate individuals about the importance of practicing safe sex and seeking medical care if they suspect they &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;have an STI.</p> 2023-04-12T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2023 Ikokwu et al.; This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. https://journali-srr.com/index.php/I-SRR/article/view/152 Knowledge and Uptake of Human Papillomavirus Vaccine among Female Adolescents in Port Harcourt. A Call for Urgent Intervention 2023-02-06T13:25:28+00:00 Ibinabo Laura Oboro ibinabo.oboro@gmail.com Daprim Samuel Ogaji <p><strong>Background:</strong> Infection with high-risk types of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with the development of cancers in both genders, affecting the genital, oropharyngeal and anal regions. Safe and effective vaccines are available against high-risk types which are responsible for majority of cases of cervical cancer. This study was conducted to assess the level of knowledge and uptake of the HPV vaccine among female adolescents in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.</p> <p><strong>Methodology: </strong>A descriptive cross-sectional survey conducted among in-school female students of both public and private secondary schools in Port Harcourt metropolis, aged 9 - 19 years. A total of 328 participants were recruited using multi-stage sampling. Information on socio-demographics, sexual history, knowledge of HPV, its vaccine and vaccine uptake were collected using a self-administered, semi-structured questionnaire. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 23. Descriptive and analytical tests were performed to determine associations and predictors of vaccine uptake.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>The level of knowledge of the availability, protective role, and schedule for administration of the HPV vaccine was poor (≤36%). Only 2.1% of girls interviewed were vaccinated with 42.9% of these having taken only one dose, thus being incompletely vaccinated. The mean age at vaccine uptake was 13.4±1.2 years. The most common reason given for not having taken the vaccine, is unawareness of the vaccine (322/328). Uptake of the vaccine was better among students at public schools.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> Social mobilization towards primary prevention of HPV infection should also focus on adolescents. Social media and school health programs/ clubs should be exploited/ improved to provide detailed and adolescent-friendly information necessary to stimulate improved uptake of the vaccine and thus reduce the devastating potential consequences of infection with the HPV.</p> 2023-01-13T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2023 Oboro and Ogaji; This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. https://journali-srr.com/index.php/I-SRR/article/view/153 Uptake, Adherence and Retention of Daily Oral Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis among Female Sex Workers in the Greater Gaborone City, Botswana 2023-02-11T12:40:12+00:00 Mary Banyana Tiro Yohana James Mashalla yohana.mashalla@hkmu.ac.tz Roy Tapera Esther Seloilwe Wame Dikobe <p><strong>Introduction</strong><strong>:</strong> Female sex workers are estimated to be 30 times more likely to be living with <a href="https://www.who.int/teams/global-hiv-hepatitis-and-stis-programmes/hiv/overview">&nbsp;Human Immuno-deficiency Virus </a>than other women of reproductive age and face an increased burden of sexually transmitted infections. Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis was introduced in Botswana in 2018 as an addition to combination-prevention strategies. Since then, no study was carried out to assess the efficiency of PrEP as an intervention. This study aimed to assess the uptake, adherence and retention of daily oral Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis among female sex workers in the Greater Gaborone City, Botswana.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong> Retrospective, quantitative cross-sectional study was carried out Between August 2018 and May 2020. Purposive sampling was used to select the study site and exhaustive sampling was used to select recorded participant’s data. Descriptive statistics using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (version 26), frequency and proportions were used to organise and analyse the data. Multiple regression analyses were performed to assess the association between variables and p =.05 was considered significant.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> 207 Female sex workers participated in the study. Adherence to Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis was high (72.9%) but retention was low (16.9%). Unemployed female sex workers adhered more to Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis and age group 18-29 was less likely to be retained in the programme. Perception of no longer at substantial risk to Human Immuno-deficiency Virus infection, loss of interest to continue with Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, drug side effects and busy life schedules were major reasons for non-retention.</p> <p><strong>Conclusions:</strong> Lack of motivation challenged effective Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis retention. Widespread messaging to communities and Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis scale-up are necessary to generate demand and support for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis uptake among Female sex workers.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> 2023-01-15T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2023 Tiro et al.; This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. https://journali-srr.com/index.php/I-SRR/article/view/155 Knowledge of Sexually Transmitted Infections and Risk Perception among Undergraduates of University of Ibadan, Ibadan, South West, Nigeria 2023-05-22T06:45:42+00:00 Faith Odion Omeneki omeneki.o.faith@gmail.com Aduke Elizabeth Ipingbemi Emmanuel Ebuka Abonyi <p><strong>Background</strong><strong>:</strong> Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) among young adults have continued to be on the increase and serious remain public health concern. The study assessed the knowledge and risk perception of STIs among undergraduate students in the University of Ibadan, Nigeria.</p> <p><strong>Methods</strong><strong>:</strong> A total of 1085 students were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire to collect data on socio-demographic characteristics, perceived risk and knowledge on STIs.&nbsp; Data was entered into IBM-SPSS version 23 and analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi-square test was used to evaluate categorical variables, p &lt; 0.05 considered significant.</p> <p><strong>Results</strong><strong>:</strong> Out of 1085 questionnaires distributed, 1050 were returned giving a response rate of 96.8%. Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) was the most frequently mentioned STI (898, 86.3%). Majority (967, 94.0%) agreed that some STIs manifest with symptoms. The most identified symptom was abnormal vaginal/penis discharge (731, 78.0%). Majority (1006, 97.4%) indicated that STI treatment should be sought first from hospital. Majority (1007, 96.5%) recognized sexually active persons with multiple sex partners are at high risk of STI acquisition, 522 (51.1%) recognized oral sex as a risky behavior. The mean knowledge score of the participants was 8.8±2.7.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong><strong>:</strong> Participants identify sexual risky behaviors and practices as predisposal to STIs. There is a knowledge gap of STIs among participants which may be improved by reviewing the educational curriculum of a mandatory course which was participants’ main source of education on STI.</p> 2023-05-22T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2023 Omeneki et al.; This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.